It is currently Thu Oct 01, 2020 8:45 pm

All times are UTC [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 4 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: Mon Jun 24, 2013 4:05 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Sep 17, 2012 1:23 pm
Posts: 82
Location: Battersea, London
These articles seem to pop up every few years and this seems like a pretty long, robust study. It's nice being reassured sub £7 wine is pretty much indintinguishable from the rest..
http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/ ... e-analysis

_________________
Viognier Reviews - my blog that does what it says in the title.
http://viognier.posterous.com


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Jun 24, 2013 9:08 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sat Apr 08, 2006 8:05 am
Posts: 2834
After drinking wine, tasting wine, writing about wine and loving wine for over twenty years, I have come to believe that wine can vary in taste depending on my general health, mood, frame of mind and food consumed in the hours prior. I also believe I’m not alone and hence take all TN's with a pinch of salt- I mostly value them for the joy they give the author.

I've also learned (the hard way) that a higher bottle price does not guarantee increased enjoyment. Drink what you like, you're only here once.

_________________
Yep, Im still here.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Jun 25, 2013 6:23 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sun Oct 12, 2008 8:13 pm
Posts: 3717
Location: Berkshire
In many ways I agree with GK's relaxed stance on the matter. We taste, so we need to be properly ready for tasting !

Good article Viog. Having looked at it again. The problem that arises in this study is the idea that a particular wine is the best. Those who love good wines will only judge the level of satisfaction for what is good for them. From there, they can judge what is not so good. What is the best, and then announce that to the whole industry is a silly notion to contemplate. Unfortunately, the moment someone decides to award points, another will decide to adjust prices. It is, how it is in the modern economy.

I do not however dismiss trusted TN's with such a light touch, a "pinch of salt" :wink: I will take notice of those who have proved in the past, that they have good taste.

I damn well expect professionals who are paid to qualify the taste of a wine to come up with a bench mark of comparison, and a recognisable and plausable statement for the flavours and character of a wine. If in doubt later, they should in my view, edit their statements if they find them "wanting" For good or ill, they should be edited, We know that this discipline could only be applied to affordable and middle ranking wines.

The professionals that I trust are pretty good and much better than that Guardian article suggests. A quick scan reveals that the article is heavily weighted towards conclusions reached in the American market - Was it Californian wines ? Of course we know that some Marketing men in some parts of the world can be particularly deceptive ! Are those marketing men influencing, or providing hospitality for the professionals ? Probably. Yet a horrible wine is plain for all to taste. Well, most people at any rate ! Unrepresentative wines due to vintage or age are much more subjective.

I know a good claret for my palate, I know a good Burgundy, and when I am fortunate enough to taste the remarkable / extraordinary and beautiful ones, I almost always agree with those professionals that I have hitherto trusted.

If I pay a significant premium for something special, and it is not up to the mark, I will politely return the wine. I have never been refused a refund.

So, being me, I think the core basis of the Guardian article is also pretty hyped up. Whether it is bull poopie or not, I don't know. Is it deserving of such a high profile headline ?
Therefore, for a balanced approach to this matter.......
Forgive me, for giving back to the author, a dose of his / her own medicine.

_________________
Duncan


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jun 26, 2013 9:54 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Sep 17, 2012 1:23 pm
Posts: 82
Location: Battersea, London
I think it highlights the pointlessness of the 100 point system when used as measure between various tasters (averaged cellartracker scores too?). The American market seems more likely to use points than the UK so it’s probably easier to look at the inconsistencies.

The comments section, as always, on the story are snarky but raise additional interesting points if you’ve got a spare 1/2 day to look at them all. If you don’t notice a note of damson in the wine until the winemaker points it out then is it really there? Etc...

It all reminds me why I like Quaffers Offers!

_________________
Viognier Reviews - my blog that does what it says in the title.
http://viognier.posterous.com


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 4 posts ] 

All times are UTC [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 9 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group